21 – 22 NOVEMBER 2020

23 september, 2019

What is the Climate Crisis Asking of Jews at this Key Moment in History?

Caring for our common home is the greatest challenge we are facing. We’ll relate to these questions: How can Jews respond the challenge posed by climate change? What are the spiritual roots of the ecological crisis, and how can Jewish teachings help the next generation inherit a livable planet? How can we address them in our own lives and communities? This session will both face the challenges and offer people hope and practical suggestions.

 

Are most kosher animal products ethical? Views of an Orthodox vegan rabbi

Ice cream tastes good. Meat tastes good. How do Jewish values relates to the animals that are involved in the process of bringing milk, cream, eggs, and meat to our plates? We will explore Jewish teachings about people’s relationship with and treatment of animals, toward a vision of a thriving and ethical planet. The session will also include viewing Jewish infographics on this topic, developed by Jewish Eco Seminars and distributed in Jewish day schools and summer camps.

 

Why what’s exciting about interfaith ecological cooperation

Why is collaboration with Christians, Muslims, and others key to a sustainable future? Climate change and water scarcity transcend borders and religions and present a collective challenge among diverse groups of people. We will share about interfaith ecology work in Israel, Africa and elsewhere in the world.

 

Tikkun Olam, Greta and the new climate activism

Filmmaker Nathan Grossman talks about the rise in climate activism he has witnessed while making a documentary about Greta Thunberg. This is followed by a moderated discussion between Nathan and Yonatan Neril, about how the climate crisis concerns Judaism and the connection to the concept of Tikkun Olam.

Moderator: Cecilia Katzeff

Yonatan Neril founded and directs The Interfaith Center for Sustainable Development and its Jewish Eco Seminars branch. Raised in California, Yonatan completed an MA and BA from Stanford, and rabbinical ordination in Israel. He speaks widely on religion and the environment, and co-organized 12 interfaith eco conferences in Israel and the U.S. He is the lead author of two Jewish eco books, and is publishing an eco Torah commentary. He lives with his wife, Shana and their 2 children in Jerusalem.